Trump’s State of the Union speech was boring and boilerplate.  His bizarre, halting teleprompter delivery seemed designed to appeal to five-year-olds.  He didn’t connect with his base because he wasn’t spontaneous and crude and vengeful.  And he didn’t connect with anyone else because he wasn’t honest.  He made a lot of promises and claims that fully contradicted the prior year of his presidency.  Nobody will remember the lengthy speech, and in the long run, the destructive actions of his administration have a far greater impact than his scripted words.

More important to the nation at the moment is the memo written by Rep Devin Nunes that Republicans on the Senate Judiciary committee voted (along party lines) to release, probably sometime soon.  The purpose of the memo, which criticizes the FBI and DOJ, appears to be twofold:

1) To give Trump ammunition to smear and/or fire Assistant Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, overseer of Mueller’s Russia Investigation.

2) To give Trump an excuse not to be interviewed by Mueller. “I wanted to do it, but after that memo, I can no longer trust the FBI to be fair to me.”

Keep in mind that, according to people in law enforcement, when investigators finally ask to interview the person at the center of their investigation, they already have their case put together.  And people with ties to the intelligence community have been saying for months that the case against Trump is far more damning than most citizens imagine.

No wonder Trump and his enablers are so desperate to trash and subvert the rule of law–because it is their only remaining card to play before Justice catches up to Trump and his family.  If Mueller does indeed have the goods on Trump, then every politician standing with him now is complicit, and must pay the price at the ballot box for their betrayal of America.  To be clear, anyone not actively standing against him is passively standing with him.  And it seems fair to say that our own Rep John Faso is standing with Trump.  We have to make sure he pays for his complicity in November.

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